the_deli_magazine
  • local channel
  • local charts
  • studios
  • submit
  • submit

 
deli cover
Drowned in Sound: Real Estate - Atlas
Drowned in Sound: Baths - Obsidian


January 2014
Shy Boys
"Shy Boys
"
mp3
Shy Boys continue to bridge the gap between the basement and the stage with the release of their debut, self-titled LP. With efficiency and restrained flourish the boys have spun off 10 pop yarns, many of which are apt to linger long past their modest 24-minute duration. While the bulk of the earworms are front-loaded the album doesn’t flag nor does it deviate in its trajectory. The consistency of this record demonstrates that the Shy Boys know their strengths and are not ashamed to stick with them.
 
Such reliability is probably why Shy Boyscomposed of the brothers Collin and Kyle Rausch and friend Konnor Ervin, have enjoyed a recent burst in popularity. In short order they’ve managed to endear themselves to a variety of local bands and fans, the label High Dive Records, and assorted music journalism outlets. It’s no wonder they recently won The Pitch award for Best Band Everyone Can Agree OnThey’re appeal is almost egalitarian. Of course it doesn’t hurt to be backed by Solid Gold, the same talent agency that promotes the likes of Dirty Beaches, The Dodos, and The Sea And Cake.
 
Call it playing it safe, but what Shy Boys lack in boundary-pushing they make up for in general likeability. This record can easily play in the background, comfortably command the car stereo, or be the gentle panacea for your private boi slash gurl bedroom troubles; odds are the record will fit most settings without much abrasion. That’s the idea. Kudos given.
 
Much of the album’s warm roughness is owed to its simple and straightforward nature as well as the inherent qualities found by recording live to tape. For this engineering feat the nod is given to Mike Nolte of Westend Recording, a studio known for their dedicated use of the mediumSure, the reverb is cranked and the vocals can be muddied into ambiguity, but those cool, moody hooks are enough to keep the record spinning on repeat.
 
--Andrew Erdrich

Rate the Artist:


Please visit The Deli's full web charts organized by genre and region.


Go to Charts

Cancel

scene blog

Album review: The Electric Lungs - Simplified and Civilized

Album review: The Electric Lungs - Simplified and Civilized

Every person that picks up a guitar for the first time does it with at least some amount of notion that it will make them a rock star. After all, any musician who tells you that they never wanted to be Brian May circa 1976 is a goddamn liar. But there comes a time in almost every musician’s life where he or she realizes that dream is just not in the cards. Not for lack of trying or talent, but sometimes that lightning just doesn’t strike. So, what to do? Some go hang up the amplifiers, squirt out four kids, and buy a split level and a Kia. Some go the dreaded, dreaded, dreaded, dreaded cover band route. But the lucky ones are able to realize that there’s so much more to the making and celebration of original music than being uber popular for it. The Electric Lungs are in this wonderful place. They play THEIR music, THEIR expression, stripped of any notion of what it’s “supposed” to sound like. With Simplified and Civilized, they play the role of trendsetters, not trend followers.

The band provides us with ten tracks of energetic, punk-tinged, keyboard rock. Tripp Kirby fronts the bursting arrangements with the overzealous spasticity of a carnival barker. His voice is perfect for these songs, his moments of tenderness and sincerity in songs like “Every Ending” and “Eternal Smile” equally as effective as his red throated scream-singing in “Illium Works” and “(It’s not the) Bones That You Break.” The rhythm section of Marc Bollinger and Eric Jones does more than just lay the foundation. Together they shape and manipulate the dynamics of these songs, building and breaking them down to great effectiveness. The wildcard is the final gloss applied by Jason Ulanet’s keyboard work. Whether synth, horn, or a just simple piano, he further propels these songs into another category. In the end, you end up with something punky, something rockabilly, something proggy, sort of like Yes and Black Flag sharing a Bloody Mary at Brian Setzer’s wine mixer.
 
“Catching Up” is their take on the good old murder ballad. With equal parts psychopath and bubble gum, The Electric Lungs would like to remind us that under every serial killer there is a sweet little boy. Or something like that.
 
“Every Ending” is such a beautifully orchestrated song, cleverly organized and woven together perfectly. It is a funky little breath of fresh air in the middle of a wolf pack of punk songs.
 
“The Shit that I Eat” bursts at the seams, kind of like Sum-41 slave-driving an old-timey jazz band. The sullied horns and old-timey piano provide a wonderful counterpoint to the otherwise straight-forward and shit-kicking punk song beneath.
 
The album closes with one of the best efforts “Away to Stay (Hey)”. With all cylinders firing at the brink of explosion, this two-and-half-minute song is the perfect amount full of pounding drums, driving bass lines, fierce guitars, howling synths, and group-shouted “heys.”
 
This is a super strong record from the first strain to the last. The band has managed to take a group of very familiar rock music elements and spin them into something most decidedly new, something most decidedly themselves, something most decidedly The Electric Lungs.
 
The Electric Lungs will be playing tonight at Coda, after Dolls on Fire and The Hillary Watts Riot. Show starts at 9:30 p.m. All ages, $5. Facebook event page. If you can't make it tonight, they'll be at The Riot Room on Friday, June 7.
 
--Zach Hodson
 

Zach Hodson is a monster. He once stole a grilled cheese sandwich from a 4-year-old girl at her birthday party. He will only juggle if you pay him. I hear he punched Slimer right in his fat, green face. He knows the secrets to free energy, but refuses to release them until "Saved by the Bell: Fortysomethings" begins production.

He is also in Dolls on Fire and Drew Black & Dirty Electric, as well as contributing to various other Kansas City-based music, comedy, and art projects.

 
 
HTML Hit Counter

 

aom

New Poll Coming Soon!

[sponsored by]



- news for musician and music industry peeps -