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September 2014
Katy Guillen & the Girls
"Katy Guillen & the Girls
"
mp3
Normally when I discover a band for the first time, I listen to their album first, then go see them live. In the case of Katy Guillen & The Girls’ new release, the situation's been reversed. I saw them live a couple of times before the album was released, so I was interested to hear if the record was going to capture the ferocity of their live performances. I have to confess that my hearing is not in the best of shape, and, due to a poor sound mix at what shall be an unnamed Lawrence venue, I never got to hear the words or even the melodies properly live at the most recent concert I attended. But upon hearing the self-titled LP, it’s nice to hear that Guillen can write literate lyrics to these songs I've heard played out.
 
The album opener, "Don't Get Bitter," hearkens back to the sound and feel of the Beatles' "Taxman," with Claire Adams' bass introducing the song. It's short, catchy, and lasts exactly as long as it should. If there were a single release off this album, this would be it.
 
This record is no-frills. It's the band pretty much as you hear them live, with the mix capturing a live in-studio sound. What strikes me listening to this record is that Katy and the Girls are not strictly a blues band. There's certainly an infusion of the blues in what they do, but, to my ears, they hearken back to some of the late ‘60s-early ‘70s hard rock bands like Mountain and Free, but with better lyrics and songs. I also hear some White Stripes in there somewhere. The melodies and harmonies are accentuated and they help blend with the powerful playing.
 
Katy Guillen, Claire Adams, and Stephanie Williams fill up a lot of space in these songs. It's obvious they are all very well in sync and have that great intuitive blend that comes from playing lots of live gigs together. I also like the changes in some of the songs, which go in directions you don't expect, like "Woke Up In Spain," which switches tempo adroitly.
 
The absolute masterpiece of this album is the last song, “Earth Angel.” It's the longest tune on the album, but it doesn't feel long. It starts out with Guillen’s dirty-sounding guitar intro, reminiscent of Jimi Hendrix's "Little Wing," and builds in intensity as it moves along. Guillen takes one hell of a solo during this song. It's obvious from hearing this record that she is an excellent guitarist but never overplays during the songs. But when the song calls for a lengthy solo, like "Earth Angel," sparks fly. The rest of the band is equally as adept. Adams’ bass lines are nimble and fit right in place with Williams’ active drum work. It's a pleasure to hear a band that obviously loves to play together rolling through these songs. The album’s producer (Duane Trower at Weights & Measures Soundlab) captures the clarity of the music as well as the power of a live performance.
 

--Barry Lee

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Album review: Drek - Drek Happens

Album review: Drek - Drek Happens

 
If you haven’t yet had the chance to listen or watch Kansas City’s own Drek, its release of Drek Happens may be the perfect time. With in-your-face instrumentals and mean vocals, this is a band that not only makes your head bob while listening, but makes your whole body move when you see them live. Drek’s latest album dropped March 30and is heavy, dirty, and will make you rethink the whole rap-rock genre.
 
The first four tracks on the album showcase the band’s heavy side of as it delivers killer guitar riffs and hard-hitting bass. “Deep Breath” lets you more into the lyrical side of Drek and reminds of the power music has on influencing mood. Drek doesn’t allow you stay in the mellow mood too long, both live and recorded. From the ballad-y feel of the previous track, “So I’ve Been Told” moves to heavy drum and guitar sounds. This track sets the mood for the rest of the album, but when you finally hit “Yup, Yup, Yup Uh Huh,” you won’t be able to keep yourself from grooving. This track goes back to early 2000s rap-rock music with a real funk-based groove to it, which is probably why it was the album’s debut single.
 
“Dirtier” delivers more of a hard southern rock feel, with a “Yee Haw” included and a funky guitar part during the verses that will get you into it. Drek wraps up the album with “The Price,” a testament to all of those who threaten you but never to the face, and I think we’ve all had those. Drek offers a nice surprise for the fans by offering a bonus track. This cover of Cypress Hill’s “Hits from the Bong” is pretty legit and gives just enough balance to the original against Drek’s hard-hitting instrumentals. Overall, you can really feel the energy of the band coming through the speakers. If you get the chance to see it live, you will see just why Drek has one of the biggest and most loyal fan bases in Kansas City.
 

This Saturday, May 11, Drek will appear at The Roxy in Overland Park with Mad Libby, Unwritten Rulz and Cronus for a fundraiser for a girl named Izzy, who is battling leukemia. Facebook event page.

--Cassiopia "KC Cassi" DeMars 

KC Cassi believes that with true local music support, you can do great things. I grew up somewhere that way and have been in Kansas City since 2005. Music can change the world and support can help spread the jams.

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